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Book Covers

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The Good Sister, by Cheslea Bolan About the Design The cover for this book was drawn by Amy Frueh to look like a mexican papel picado (paper cutout). She drew all elements of this cover using Adobe Illustrator and each image is an icon representing a person or an event from the novel.   About the Book Winner of the HarperCollins/UBC Prize for Best New Fiction Just shy of her fifteenth birthday, Gabriela Amador Prieto has been cast out of the family home by her father for tarnishing the family honour. All traces of her are brutally erased, and not even Lucy, Gabi’s older sister and best friend, knows where she is. Furious at her father and desperate to find her sister, Lucy leaves their small town in Baja California, Mexico, and sets out for the capital to track Gabriela down. Lucy ventures deep into Mexico City’s most dangerous neighbourhoods, coming face to face with the dark underbelly of the city, while back at home her family members—her parents, her brothers, and her devious brother-in-law, Antonio—struggle with their own complicity in Gabi’s fate. Winner of the HarperCollins/UBC Prize for Best New Fiction, The Good Sister is an urgent, timely, and moving exploration of betrayal and steadfast devotion, and the ways in which our own intolerance can harm what—and who—we love most.

The Good Sister, by Cheslea Bolan

About the Design

The cover for this book was drawn by Amy Frueh to look like a mexican papel picado (paper cutout). She drew all elements of this cover using Adobe Illustrator and each image is an icon representing a person or an event from the novel.

 

About the Book

Winner of the HarperCollins/UBC Prize for Best New Fiction

Just shy of her fifteenth birthday, Gabriela Amador Prieto has been cast out of the family home by her father for tarnishing the family honour. All traces of her are brutally erased, and not even Lucy, Gabi’s older sister and best friend, knows where she is. Furious at her father and desperate to find her sister, Lucy leaves their small town in Baja California, Mexico, and sets out for the capital to track Gabriela down.

Lucy ventures deep into Mexico City’s most dangerous neighbourhoods, coming face to face with the dark underbelly of the city, while back at home her family members—her parents, her brothers, and her devious brother-in-law, Antonio—struggle with their own complicity in Gabi’s fate.

Winner of the HarperCollins/UBC Prize for Best New Fiction, The Good Sister is an urgent, timely, and moving exploration of betrayal and steadfast devotion, and the ways in which our own intolerance can harm what—and who—we love most.

About the Design/Illustration This cover was illustrated and designed for her good friend, the talented poet Adele Barclay using Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop. The illustration evokes the sense of fluidity, entanglement, entrapment, and the poet's own long, black hair.  About the Book If I Were In A Cage I’d Reach Out For You is a collection that travels through both time and place, liminally occupying the chasm between Canadiana and Americana mythologies. These poems dwell in surreal pockets of the everyday warped landscapes of modern cities and flood into the murky basin of the intimate. Amidst the comings and goings, there’s a sincere desire to connect to others, an essential need to reach out, to redraft the narratives that make kinship radical and near. These poems are love letters to the uncomfortable, the unfathomable, and the altered geographies that define our own misshapen understandings of the world. "With a depth of feeling for places and their connecting joys and aches, these are beautifully written poems, vivid as the morning paper, bracing as moonshine." -David McGimpsey, author of Sitcom and Asbestos Heights

About the Design/Illustration

This cover was illustrated and designed for her good friend, the talented poet Adele Barclay using Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop. The illustration evokes the sense of fluidity, entanglement, entrapment, and the poet's own long, black hair. 

About the Book

If I Were In A Cage I’d Reach Out For You is a collection that travels through both time and place, liminally occupying the chasm between Canadiana and Americana mythologies. These poems dwell in surreal pockets of the everyday warped landscapes of modern cities and flood into the murky basin of the intimate.

Amidst the comings and goings, there’s a sincere desire to connect to others, an essential need to reach out, to redraft the narratives that make kinship radical and near. These poems are love letters to the uncomfortable, the unfathomable, and the altered geographies that define our own misshapen understandings of the world.


"With a depth of feeling for places and their connecting joys and aches, these are beautifully written poems, vivid as the morning paper, bracing as moonshine."
-David McGimpsey, author of Sitcom and Asbestos Heights

About the Design The photograph was purchased from Getty Images and minimally manipulated to retain an authentic feel (dodging/burning only). The banner is done in official Liberal Party red—the fonts are the officially recognized Liberal Party fonts, as specified by the Liberal Party website. Both banner and fonts are meant to evoke the feeling of the political party, without being overt or ostentatious to the viewer.  About the Book Nearly twenty years after his death and more than thirty since his retirement from active politics, Pierre Elliott Trudeau is at long last receding from the lived memory of Canadians. But despite the distance of time, he still holds court in the minds of many, and today his son Justin now lives at 24 Sussex Drive, his own man, though still a Trudeau holding Canada’s highest office. Trudeaumania is about Pierre Trudeau’s rise to power in 1968. This is a story we thought we knew—the epic saga of the hipster Montrealer who drove up to Ottawa in his Mercedes in 1965, wowed the country with his dictum that “the state has no business in the bedrooms of the nation,” rocked the new medium of television like no one since JFK, and in scant months rode the crest of Canadians’ Centennial-era euphoria into power. This is Canada’s own Camelot myth. It embodies the quirkiness, the passion and the youthful exuberance we ascribe to the 1960s even now. Many of us cherish it. Unfortunately, it is almost entirely wrong. In 1968 Trudeau put forward his vision for Canada’s second century, without guile, without dissembling and without a hard sell. Take it or leave it, he told Canadians. If you do not like my ideas, vote for someone else. We took it. By bestselling and award-winning author Robert Wright, Trudeaumania sets the record straight even as it illuminates this important part of our history and shines a light on our future.

About the Design

The photograph was purchased from Getty Images and minimally manipulated to retain an authentic feel (dodging/burning only). The banner is done in official Liberal Party red—the fonts are the officially recognized Liberal Party fonts, as specified by the Liberal Party website. Both banner and fonts are meant to evoke the feeling of the political party, without being overt or ostentatious to the viewer. 

About the Book

Nearly twenty years after his death and more than thirty since his retirement from active politics, Pierre Elliott Trudeau is at long last receding from the lived memory of Canadians. But despite the distance of time, he still holds court in the minds of many, and today his son Justin now lives at 24 Sussex Drive, his own man, though still a Trudeau holding Canada’s highest office.

Trudeaumania is about Pierre Trudeau’s rise to power in 1968. This is a story we thought we knew—the epic saga of the hipster Montrealer who drove up to Ottawa in his Mercedes in 1965, wowed the country with his dictum that “the state has no business in the bedrooms of the nation,” rocked the new medium of television like no one since JFK, and in scant months rode the crest of Canadians’ Centennial-era euphoria into power. This is Canada’s own Camelot myth. It embodies the quirkiness, the passion and the youthful exuberance we ascribe to the 1960s even now. Many of us cherish it. Unfortunately, it is almost entirely wrong. In 1968 Trudeau put forward his vision for Canada’s second century, without guile, without dissembling and without a hard sell. Take it or leave it, he told Canadians. If you do not like my ideas, vote for someone else. We took it.

By bestselling and award-winning author Robert Wright, Trudeaumania sets the record straight even as it illuminates this important part of our history and shines a light on our future.

About the Design (printing January 2017) The cover was designed using a stock photo from Getty Images, which was then duplicated to look like a double exposure. Soft rainbow hues were then added to lighten the mood of this otherwise dark cover, making it more appropriate for its target audience (young adults). A grit texture was added to the image to contrast against the clean sans serif type—juxtaposing old and new to give the cover a timeless feel. About the Book It’s Lark’s seventeenth birthday, and although she’s hated to be reminded of the day ever since her mom’s death three years ago, it’s off to a great start. Lark has written a killer song to perform with her band, the weather is stunning and she’s got a date with gorgeous Alec. The two take a canoe out on the lake, and everything is perfect—until Lark hears the screams. Annabelle, a little girl she used to babysit, is drowning in the nearby reeds while Annabelle’s mom tries desperately to reach her. Lark and Alec are closer, and they both dive in. But Alec hits his head on a rock in the water and begins to flail. Alec and Annabelle are drowning. And Lark can save only one of them. Lark chooses, and in that moment her world splits into two distinct lives. She must live with the consequences of both choices. As Lark finds herself going down more than one path, she has to decide: Which life is the right one? Alice Kuipers, the award-winning author of 40 Things I Want to Tell You and Life on the Refrigerator Door, is an expert chronicler of the teenage heart, and she takes her work to new heights here. A riveting, high-concept novel with heart, Me and Me is about what it feels like to be torn in pieces, and about finally finding out who you really are.

About the Design (printing January 2017)

The cover was designed using a stock photo from Getty Images, which was then duplicated to look like a double exposure. Soft rainbow hues were then added to lighten the mood of this otherwise dark cover, making it more appropriate for its target audience (young adults). A grit texture was added to the image to contrast against the clean sans serif type—juxtaposing old and new to give the cover a timeless feel.

About the Book

It’s Lark’s seventeenth birthday, and although she’s hated to be reminded of the day ever since her mom’s death three years ago, it’s off to a great start. Lark has written a killer song to perform with her band, the weather is stunning and she’s got a date with gorgeous Alec. The two take a canoe out on the lake, and everything is perfect—until Lark hears the screams. Annabelle, a little girl she used to babysit, is drowning in the nearby reeds while Annabelle’s mom tries desperately to reach her. Lark and Alec are closer, and they both dive in. But Alec hits his head on a rock in the water and begins to flail.

Alec and Annabelle are drowning. And Lark can save only one of them.

Lark chooses, and in that moment her world splits into two distinct lives. She must live with the consequences of both choices. As Lark finds herself going down more than one path, she has to decide: Which life is the right one?

Alice Kuipers, the award-winning author of 40 Things I Want to Tell You and Life on the Refrigerator Door, is an expert chronicler of the teenage heart, and she takes her work to new heights here. A riveting, high-concept novel with heart, Me and Me is about what it feels like to be torn in pieces, and about finally finding out who you really are.

About the Design This cover option was hand-painted using watercolor and gouache by Amy Frueh, to fulfill the author's artistic preferences indicated by her cover comps. It is both modern (the woman's face is illuminated by a computer screen) and timeless (using traditional medium). About the Book Sarah Lundy has a secret online life, and it might all come crashing down. Back at the beginning of the new millennium, when the Internet was still unknown territory, Sarah Lundy started an anonymous blog documenting her return to the dating scene after a devastating divorce. The blog was funny, brutally honest and sometimes outrageous. Readers loved it. Through her blog persona, “Mitzi Bytes,” Sarah not only found her feet again, but she found her voice. Fifteen years later, Sarah is happily remarried with children and she’s still blogging, but nobody IRL—not even her husband or best friends—knows about Mitzi. They don't know that Sarah’s been documenting all her own exploits, as well as mining the experiences of those around her and sharing these stories with the world. Which means that Sarah is in serious trouble when threatening emails arrive from the mysterious Jane Q. Time’s up, the first one says. You’re officially found out. As she tries to find out Jane Q’s identity before her secret online self is revealed to everyone, Sarah starts to discover that her loved ones have secrets of their own, and that stronger forces than she imagined are conspiring to turn her world upside down. A grown-up Harriet the Spy for the digital age, Mitzi Bytes examines the bonds of family and friendship, and the truths we dare tell about ourselves—and others.

About the Design

This cover option was hand-painted using watercolor and gouache by Amy Frueh, to fulfill the author's artistic preferences indicated by her cover comps. It is both modern (the woman's face is illuminated by a computer screen) and timeless (using traditional medium).

About the Book

Sarah Lundy has a secret online life, and it might all come crashing down.

Back at the beginning of the new millennium, when the Internet was still unknown territory, Sarah Lundy started an anonymous blog documenting her return to the dating scene after a devastating divorce. The blog was funny, brutally honest and sometimes outrageous. Readers loved it. Through her blog persona, “Mitzi Bytes,” Sarah not only found her feet again, but she found her voice.

Fifteen years later, Sarah is happily remarried with children and she’s still blogging, but nobody IRL—not even her husband or best friends—knows about Mitzi. They don't know that Sarah’s been documenting all her own exploits, as well as mining the experiences of those around her and sharing these stories with the world. Which means that Sarah is in serious trouble when threatening emails arrive from the mysterious Jane Q. Time’s up, the first one says. You’re officially found out.

As she tries to find out Jane Q’s identity before her secret online self is revealed to everyone, Sarah starts to discover that her loved ones have secrets of their own, and that stronger forces than she imagined are conspiring to turn her world upside down.

A grown-up Harriet the Spy for the digital age, Mitzi Bytes examines the bonds of family and friendship, and the truths we dare tell about ourselves—and others.

About the Design This hardcover jacket was designed using an author-supplied photo. Amy Frueh cut the author image from the rest of the photo—a dizzying array of lights and cacophony of seating, and used a classic serif front to give the jacket a distinguished and elegant air. About the Book While much has been written about his father, Sam, a titan of industry, there is no public record of Charles Bronfman’s thoughts on his own life, family, career and his significant accomplishments in sport and philanthropy. Distilled does just that, chronicling key events in the life of the heir to one of Canada’s great fortunes. Born in 1931 to the fabulously wealthy Bronfmans, Charles grew up in a 20-room mansion with many staff. Via their control of the distilling giant Seagram, the Bronfman family dominated the liquor business with brands such as Crown Royal, V.O. and Chivas Regal. By the 1980s, Seagram was also the biggest shareholder of DuPont and by the 1990s, the family’s wealth was in the billions, culminating in the $35-billion sale of Seagram to France’s Vivendi, which turned into a financial and family disaster. In Distilled, Charles reflects on all of it--his relationship with his parents, his brother Edgar, working in the family business, landing Canada’s first big league baseball franchise (the Montreal Expos), leading a philanthropic life by promoting Canadian identity through Heritage Minutes and supporting Israel through countless innovative initiatives including the globally respected Birthright Israel--and to how the Bronfman family splintered over the sale of Seagram.

About the Design

This hardcover jacket was designed using an author-supplied photo. Amy Frueh cut the author image from the rest of the photo—a dizzying array of lights and cacophony of seating, and used a classic serif front to give the jacket a distinguished and elegant air.

About the Book

While much has been written about his father, Sam, a titan of industry, there is no public record of Charles Bronfman’s thoughts on his own life, family, career and his significant accomplishments in sport and philanthropy.

Distilled does just that, chronicling key events in the life of the heir to one of Canada’s great fortunes. Born in 1931 to the fabulously wealthy Bronfmans, Charles grew up in a 20-room mansion with many staff. Via their control of the distilling giant Seagram, the Bronfman family dominated the liquor business with brands such as Crown Royal, V.O. and Chivas Regal. By the 1980s, Seagram was also the biggest shareholder of DuPont and by the 1990s, the family’s wealth was in the billions, culminating in the $35-billion sale of Seagram to France’s Vivendi, which turned into a financial and family disaster. In Distilled, Charles reflects on all of it--his relationship with his parents, his brother Edgar, working in the family business, landing Canada’s first big league baseball franchise (the Montreal Expos), leading a philanthropic life by promoting Canadian identity through Heritage Minutes and supporting Israel through countless innovative initiatives including the globally respected Birthright Israel--and to how the Bronfman family splintered over the sale of Seagram.